Please note our 24/7 emergency line number is: 402-961-1718

NCDHD understands concerns over the new COVID-19 virus can make us anxious. While we don’t know where and to what extent this disease may spread here in Nebraska, we do know that it is contagious. As we go about our daily lives, we ask that you remain watchful in yourself, your family, and those you may care for when it comes to symptoms of illness. This page serves a place to find additional information or resources.

The Center for Disease Control (CDC) website or the Word Health Organization (WHO) website is where you can find the most up-to-date information that is available. 


World Health Organization Recommendations (WHO)

WHO COVID-19 Resource Page

WHO on Social Distancing


CDC Recommendations

CDC COVID-19 Resource Page

CDC Guidance on Large Events and Mass Gatherings

Coronavirus Disease 2019 Information for Travel

Preventing COVID-19 Spread in Communities

Protect Yourself and Your Family


State of Nebraska Health and Human Services

COVID-19 Information from DHHS


University of Nebraska Medical Center (UNMC)

COVID-19 in Nebraska (map)


Other Resources

COVID Companion – Free Text-Message Based Program


 

COVID-19 Testing in NCDHD Service Area 3/26/2020 10:00 AM

Antelope County: Resident Tested: 1, Negative Test: 1, Positive Result: 0, Probable Case: 0
Boyd County: Resident Tested: 0, Negative Test: 0, Positive Result: 0, Probable Case: 0
Brown County: Resident Tested: 2, Negative Test: 1, Positive Result: 0, Probable Case: 0
Cherry County: Resident Tested: 4, Negative Test: 3, Positive Result: 0, Probable Case: 0
Holt County: Resident Tested: 15, Negative Test: 12, Positive Result: 0, Probable Case: 0
Keya Paha County: Resident Tested: 0, Negative Test: 0, Positive Result: 0 , Probable Case: 0
Knox County: Resident Tested: 16, Negative Test: 9, Positive Result: 2, Probable Case: 3
Pierce County: Resident Tested: 4, Negative Test: 3, Positive Result: 0, Probable Case: 0
Rock County: Resident Tested: 1, Negative Test: 1, Positive Result: 0, Probable Case: 0

updated 3/26/2020


Social Distancing Heros

Do you know a business or organization that has gone “above & beyond” to promote social distancing during the COVID-19 pandemic? Examples may include switching to drive-thru and take-out only or allowing employees to work from home. Let us know about them so we can recognize their efforts!

Send your nominations to: health@ncdhd.ne.gov 

updated: 3/25/2020


A new study suggests how long coronavirus can stay on surfaces

Click here for full details

updated: 3/24/2020


Governor Pete Ricketts Daily Press Conferences

Follow this link for more information from the Office of Governor Pete Ricketts

https://governor.nebraska.gov/

updated: 3/25/2020


Recommendations to Returning Out-of-State Travelers

The best way to minimize COVID-19 virus introduction/spread in Nebraska is to:
1. limit unnecessary travel;
2. upon return from out-of-state travel: maximize self-quarantine, social distancing, and non-pharmaceutical interventions (e.g., washing hands often, staying home if you are ill, covering your cough/sneezes, and cleaning frequently touched surfaces (www.cdc.gov/nonpharmaceutical-interventions).

Out-of-state travelers: When to Self-monitor, Self-quarantine, or Self-isolate:
Returning international travelers from regions with widespread sustained transmission (e.g., CDC Level 3 countries – https://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/notices#alert ) should self-quarantine for 14 days following return.

Widespread local transmission is occurring in many regions of the U.S., and may be unrecognized and underreported due to the lack of testing. Returning travelers from regions of the U.S. with widespread transmission should self-quarantine for 14 days following return (e.g., Santa Clara County, CA; New York City, NY; Seattle, WA; etc.). Please note with continued widespread transmission across the U.S., the listed areas above are an example and may change over time.

Any returning traveler who develops fever or respiratory illness symptoms, should immediately self-isolate, and report to a healthcare provider if symptoms are severe or medical attention is needed (calling ahead, when possible). If symptoms are mild, follow home care guidance and guidance to discontinue self-isolation (further defined below).

Every healthcare worker who returns from out-of-state travel (excluding commuters) should consult with a trained medical professional at their facility (e.g., infection preventionist or physician) and establish a specific infection control protocol (e.g., PPE while at work, self-monitoring, self-quarantine) that mitigates patient and co-worker exposures. Special considerations should be taken for those working with high-risk patients (e.g., patients in long-term care, chronic heart or lung conditions, diabetes, pregnant women).

All other out-of-state travelers (excluding commuters that cross the state border, they are not considered at-risk) returning from any other international or domestic locations, should limit public interactions, practice strict social distancing, self-monitor for symptoms, and self-quarantine for 14 days if feasible.

Discontinuation from self-monitoring and self-quarantine:
1. Discontinuation from self-quarantine and self-monitoring may cease if after 14 days there has been NO development of respiratory illness symptoms. Symptoms may include fever, cough, shortness of breath, sore throat, runny nose.

Discontinuation from self-isolation:
1. CDC guidance (www.cdc.gov/…/2019-ncov/if-you-are-sick/steps-when-sick.html) states that an individual can stop self-isolation if:
First, it has been at least 7 days since symptoms first appeared
AND
Second, no fever for at least 72 hours (fever-free for 3 full days off fever-reducing medicine)
AND
Third, all other symptoms have improved (e.g., cough has improved)

updated: 3/23/2020


Updated Public Health Recommendations for Travelers

All returning travelers, from any international or domestic location, have an increased risk of COVID-19 infection.
• All returning travelers, from any international or domestic location, should limit public interactions, practice strict social distancing, and self-monitor for symptoms.
• IF a returning traveler develops a fever or respiratory illness, they need to IMMEDIATELY self-isolate and report to a healthcare provider or local health department.
• Returning travelers should assume that COVID-19 disease is present at the locations they have visited and traveled through. Additional specific information might available on CDC, state, and local public health websites and from media sources.
• More jurisdictions have widespread sustained transmission (e.g., CDC Level 3 countries – https://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/notices#alert – plus U.S. locales such as Seattle, WA; New York City; and Santa Clara County, CA).
• To limit spread in Nebraska, all travelers should self-quarantine for 14 days upon returning home and immediately report any symptoms consistent with COVID-19 infection to their health care provider. Individuals unable to observe the 14-day self-quarantine should consult with their local health department about appropriate actions.
• Every health care worker who returns from travel should consult with a trained medical professional at their facility (e.g., infection preventionist or physician) and establish a specific infection control protocol (e.g., home quarantine, self-monitoring, PPE while at work) that mitigates patient and co-worker exposures.

updated: 03/19/2020


Additional Information on Second Positive Knox County COVID-19 Case

NCDHD Public Service Announcement

On Wednesday, March 18th North Central District Health Department (NCDHD) was made aware of additional community exposure times relating to the second positive COVID-19 case in Knox County.

NCDHD has initiated contact investigations and have been rapidly assessing potential exposures to determine next steps. All identified close contacts will self-quarantine (stay home) and be actively monitored twice daily by public health officials for fever and respiratory symptoms.

At this time, the only known community exposure times related to the case, which remains at low risk, are the following:

  • Saturday, March 14th from 1:00 PM – 4:00 PM at Dollar General in Hooper, NE
  • Sunday, March 15th from 9:30 AM-11:30 AM at Country Market in Bloomfield, NE
  • Monday, March 16th from 2:00 PM – 3:00 PM at Walmart in Norfolk, NE
  • Monday, March 16th from 3:00 PM – 3:30 PM at Sonic Drive-In drive-thru in Norfolk, NE

At this time, general risk to the community remains low, however NCDHD encourages the individuals who might have been at these locations during these times to self-monitor for the onset of fever, cough, shortness of breath for 14 days which would be through March 29, 2020.  If you feel you are ill, please call your provider and follow their next steps.

updated: 3/18/2020


“COVID-19 Positive Case”
NCDHD Public Service Announcement

On Tuesday, March 17th North Central District Health Department was made aware of a positive COVID-19 case in our district. The person is a man in his 30s and a resident in Knox county. He recently traveled to another state where there is community transmission of COVID-19. He is self-isolating at home.

NCDHD has initiated contact investigations and have been rapidly assessing potential exposures to determine next steps. All identified close contacts will self-quarantine (stay home) and be actively monitored twice daily by public health officials for fever and respiratory symptoms.

At this time, the only known community exposure times, which is low risk, related to the case are the following:

• Sunday, March 15th from 9:30 AM-11:30 AM at Country Market in Bloomfield, NE
• Saturday, March 14th from 1:00 PM – 4:00 PM at Dollar General in Hooper, NE

At this time, general risk to the community remains low, however NCDHD encourages the community to self-monitor their symptoms. Symptoms of COVID-19 are fever, cough, and shortness of breath. If you feel you are ill, please call your provider and follow their next steps.

updated: 3/17/2020


 

Gov. Ricketts Issues Executive Order to Give Public Boards the Flexibility to Hold Virtual Meetings

LINCOLN – Today, Governor Pete Ricketts issued an executive order to permit state and local governmental boards, commissions, and other public bodies to meet by videoconference, teleconference, or other electronic means through May 31, 2020.  The Governor’s order stipulated that all such virtual meetings must be available to members of the public, including media, to give citizens the opportunity to participate as well as to be duly informed of the meetings’ proceedings.  The Governor’s order did not waive the advanced publicized notice and the agenda requirements for public meetings.

The Governor’s executive order comes a day after the White House Coronavirus Task Force issued guidance limiting social gatherings to 10 people or less through March 31, 2020.  The executive order is part of an overall public health strategy to increase social distancing to stem the spread of the coronavirus disease.

The complete text of the executive order.
EO 20-03 – Corona Virus – Public Mtgs .pdf

updated: 3/17/2020


Important COVID-19 Note on Travel 

If you choose to travel, please monitor where you are going before you leave and know there might be a chance you will have to quarantine for 14-days when you return. Also, consider how a 14-day quarantine will impact your work and childcare.

updated: 3/17/2020


Gov. Ricketts Reminds Nebraskans of CDC Guidance Limiting Gatherings to Ten People

LINCOLN – This afternoon, Governor Pete Ricketts reminded Nebraskans of new guidance from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) limiting gatherings to ten people or less.

“I want to remind everyone that the 10-person limit is guidance from the CDC,” said Gov. Ricketts.  “It is not a law enforcement action.  It’s going to take individual action from all of us to make this work.  Please use common sense in applying it.  There will be a great sacrifice for all of us in this.  Together, we can combat COVID-19 and keep Nebraskans healthy.”

The most recent guidance can be found by clicking here.

updated: 3/16/2020


Important COVID-19 Testing Resources For People And Providers

LINCOLN – Public health officials, health care providers, and laboratories are working daily to increase Nebraska’s capacity to test more people for COVID-19.

Currently, testing supplies are limited. Local, state, and federal partners are working to expand testing supplies and the ability to promptly test people experiencing symptoms.

Due to testing limitations, health care providers and local health departments are screening people to prioritize testing for those who based on symptoms and exposure history have the highest likelihood of having COVID-19 including:

  • Hospitalized patients who have signs and symptoms compatible with COVID-19.
  • Symptomatic patients with a high risk of getting very sick from COVID-19 such as older adults and individuals with underlying health conditions like diabetes, heart disease and lung disease.
  • People including healthcare workers who within 14 days of symptom onset had close contact with a suspected or confirmed COVID-19 patient.
  • People who have a history of travel from affected geographic areas (https://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/notices#alert ) within 14 days of their symptom onset.
  • Other factors, which can guide COVID-19 testing decisions like COVID-19 infections in a certain area especially where community transmission has been reported.

People who are concerned they may have COVID-19 should self-isolate and call ahead to their primary care provider to be screened over the phone. The provider can evaluate and determine if testing is necessary. Flu activity is also still high in Nebraska. Flu tests should be considered as a first test option before considering a COVID-19 test. “We believe that these resources will be most valuable to our public and the medical providers that are diligently treating sick patients and assessing others who may have had exposure,” said Dr. Gary Anthone, Director of Public Health and Chief Medical Officer for DHHS.

Providers with the resources to evaluate and test patients for COVID-19 virus, and who would like to be added to our DHHS testing availability list should email alexis.trout@nebraska.gov with your complete contact information.

As we are able to test more people, we’ll provide additional information on where Nebraskans can receive testing on the healthcare network list at www.dhhs.ne.gov/coronavirus.

DHHS will continue to update Nebraskans through the DHHS website and on Facebook and Twitter as we have new information. The CDC’s website is also a good resource for COVID-19 information – https://www.cdc.gov/covid19 .

updated: 3/15/2020


COVID-19 Case Update – Potential High Numbers Of Community Exposures Associated With Cases In Douglas County

LINCOLN – The first community transmitted case of coronavirus disease 2019 was identified in Douglas County yesterday. Today, contact investigations related to cases of COVID-19 in Douglas County also have identified several events and locations in the Omaha area and Sarpy County that could result in potentially high numbers of people exposed in the community and could affect Nebraskans statewide.

People who were at the following locations – https://www.douglascountyhealth.com/latest-news  – during the time frames mentioned should self monitor for the development symptoms that include a fever, cough, shortness of breath and in some cases a sore throat.

“We are monitoring the situation for a second community-acquired case, said Dr. Gary Anthone, Chief Medical Officer and Director of Public Health for the Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS). “The number of exposures associated with these events is potentially very high and may be beyond the ability for public health to continue to do complete contact tracing as we have been able to do up until this point.

“We need your help. DHHS is advising Nebraskans to stay home if they’re experiencing any symptoms consistent with COVID-19 or other respiratory illnesses including fever, cough, shortness of breath and in some cases a sore throat. By staying home you protect those in your community.”

Social distancing and taking other actions to slow the spread of COVID-19 is critical. Slowing the spread of the virus will help decrease the potential strain on health care providers and facilities and help ensure care for those who may need it.

As we’ve already seen in some areas, Nebraskans should continue to expect closures and cancellations in their communities as we work to slow the spread of COVID-19. Guidance for events, public gatherings and schools is available on the DHHS website – http://dhhs.ne.gov/coronavirus.

People experiencing symptoms who are concerned they may have COVID-19 should self-isolate and call ahead to their primary care provider to be screened over the phone. The provider can evaluate and determine if testing is necessary. Flu activity is also still high in Nebraska. Flu tests should be considered as a first test option before considering a COVID-19 test.

COVID-19 testing

Public health officials, health care providers, and laboratories are working daily to increase Nebraska’s capacity to test more people for COVID-19.

Currently, testing supplies are limited and testing is only being done on people who have symptoms.

While we work to increase supplies and testing, health care providers and local health departments are screening people to prioritize testing for those who have the highest likelihood of being exposed to or having COVID-19 including:

  • Hospitalized patients who have signs and symptoms compatible with COVID-19.
  • People with symptoms such as, older adults and individuals with underlying health conditions like diabetes, heart disease and lung disease that may put them at higher risk of getting very sick from COVID-19.
  • People who have had close contact with a suspect or confirmed COVID-19 patient in the last 14 days and have symptoms starting after this contact.
  • People who have a history of travel from affected areas (international or U.S. –  (https://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/notices#alert ) in the last 14 days and have symptoms starting after this contact.
  • Other factors may also help guide COVID-19 testing decisions like COVID-19 infections in a certain area and known community transmission.

New testing resources for people and providers

Health care providers can find the latest guidance for COVID-19 testing here – http://dhhs.ne.gov/Pages/Health-Alert-Network.aspx.

Public health partners across the state continue to take action to protect the health of Nebraskans.

Certain people are at higher risk of getting very sick from COVID-19 including older adults and people who have serious chronic medical conditions like heart disease, diabetes and lung disease, according to the CDC.

People in these higher-risk groups should: 

  • Stock up on supplies , including extra necessary medications.
  • Take everyday precautions  to keep space between yourself and others.
  • When you go out in public, keep away from others who are sick, limit close contact and wash your hands often.
  • Avoid crowds  as much as possible.
  • Avoid cruise travel  and non-essential air travel.
  • If there is a COVID-19 outbreak in your community, stay home  as much as possible to further reduce your risk of being exposed.

Everyone can help reduce the spread of COVID-19 and other respiratory infections by:

  • Avoiding close contact with sick people and stay home if you are sick.
  • Washing hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water aren’t available, use an alcohol-based sanitizer.
  • Avoiding touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Covering your nose and mouth with a tissue when you cough or sneeze then throw the tissue in the trash.
  • Cleaning and disinfecting frequently touched objects and surfaces.

Here’s where to find tools and resources for individuals and families, schools, communities, businesses, healthcare facilities, and first responders on the DHHS website – http://dhhs.ne.gov/coronavirus and CDC’s website – https://www.cdc.gov/covid19 .

DHHS opened a statewide coronavirus (COVID-19) information line to help answer general questions and share the latest information and resources with Nebraskans to help keep them informed. The number is (402) 552-6645; hours of operation are 8 a.m.-8 p.m. CST, 7 days a week.

DHHS will continue to update Nebraskans through the DHHS website and on Facebook and Twitter as we have new information. The CDC’s website is also a good resource for COVID-19 information – https://www.cdc.gov/covid19 .

updated: 3/15/2020


First Community Spread COVID-19 Case Identified in Douglas County

LINCOLN – The first community spread case of coronavirus disease 2019 was identified in Douglas County today. It is the woman in her 60s who tested positive yesterday and was reported as a travel-related case. The Douglas County Health Department’s continuing investigation determined her symptoms were present before she traveled so the case is now being classified as community spread. She continues to self-isolate at home.

“We will continue to see more cases in Nebraska and we expect additional community transmission of COVID-19,  but we can all work together to help slow the spread,” said Dr. Gary Anthone, Chief Medical Officer and Director of Public Health for the Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS).  “Nebraskans need to be extra vigilant and stay home if they’re experiencing any symptoms consistent with COVID-19 or other respiratory illnesses including fever, cough, shortness of breath and in some cases a sore throat.”

As we’ve already seen in some areas, Nebraskans should expect closures and cancellations in their communities as we work to slow the spread of COVID-19.

Two additional presumptive positive cases that are travel-related were reported to DHHS today, along with another case under investigation. All are from Douglas County. One is a male in his 50s who recently traveled to Spain and the other is a male in his 30s who traveled to Douglas County from Singapore. Both are self-isolating and DCHD is in the process of identifying close contacts to help reduce further spread.

You can find further information on the Douglas County Health Department’s website – https://www.douglascountyhealth.com/latest-news 

People who are concerned they may have COVID-19 should self-isolate and call ahead to their primary care provider to be screened over the phone. The provider can evaluate and determine if testing is necessary. Flu activity is also still high in Nebraska. Flu tests should be considered as a first test option before considering a COVID-19 test.

Public health officials, health care providers, and laboratories are working daily to increase Nebraska’s capacity to test more people for COVID-19.

Currently, testing supplies are limited. Local, state, and federal partners are working to expand testing supplies and the ability to test people experiencing symptoms as quickly as possible.

While we work to increase supplies and testing, health care providers and local health departments are screening people to prioritize testing for those who have the highest likelihood of being exposed to or having COVID-19 including:

  • Hospitalized patients who have signs and symptoms compatible with COVID-19.
  • People with symptoms such as, older adults and individuals with underlying health conditions like diabetes, heart disease and lung disease that may put them at higher risk of getting very sick from COVID-19.
  • People who have had close contact with a suspect or confirmed COVID-19 patient in the last 14 days and have symptoms starting after this contact.
  • People who have a history of travel from affected areas (international or U.S. – https://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/notices#alert ) in the last 14 days and have symptoms starting after this contact.
  • Other factors may also help guide COVID-19 testing decisions like COVID-19 infections in a certain area and known community transmission.

Health care providers can find the latest guidance for COVID-19 testing here – http://dhhs.ne.gov/Pages/Health-Alert-Network.aspx.

Public health partners across the state continue to take action to protect the health of Nebraskans.

Certain people are at higher risk of getting very sick from COVID-19 including older adults and people who have serious chronic medical conditions like heart disease, diabetes and lung disease, according to the CDC.

People in these higher-risk groups should: 

  • Stock up on supplies, including extra necessary medications.
  • Take everyday precautions to keep space between yourself and others.
  • When you go out in public, keep away from others who are sick, limit close contact and wash your hands often.
  • Avoid crowds as much as possible.
  • Avoid cruise travel and non-essential air travel.
  • If there is a COVID-19 outbreak in your community, stay home as much as possible to further reduce your risk of being exposed.

Everyone can help reduce the spread of COVID-19 and other respiratory infections by:

  • Avoiding close contact with sick people and stay home if you are sick.
  • Washing hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water aren’t available, use an alcohol-based sanitizer.
  • Avoiding touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Covering your nose and mouth with a tissue when you cough or sneeze then throw the tissue in the trash.
  • Cleaning and disinfecting frequently touched objects and surfaces.

Here’s where to find tools and resources for individuals and families, schools, communities, businesses, healthcare facilities, and first responders on the DHHS website – http://dhhs.ne.gov/coronavirus and CDC’s website – https://www.cdc.gov/covid19 .

DHHS opened a statewide coronavirus (COVID-19) information line to help answer general questions and share the latest information and resources with Nebraskans to help keep them informed. The number is (402) 552-6645; hours of operation are 8 a.m.-8 p.m. CST, 7 days a week.

DHHS will continue to update Nebraskans through the DHHS website and on Facebook and Twitter as we have new information. The CDC’s website is also a good resource for COVID-19 information – https://www.cdc.gov/covid19 .

updated: 3/14/2020


Gov. Ricketts Issues Emergency Declaration for COVID-19

Click here for full details

LINCOLN – As Nebraska continues to take proactive steps to address COVID-19, Governor Pete Ricketts has signed an emergency declaration, so regulatory provisions of state law can be suspended to aid the state’s response.  This has also allowed him to issue an Executive Order waiving certain hauling requirements for truckers delivering food and supplies, such as food products to grocery stores.

“I am declaring a State of Emergency in Nebraska as we continue to work to be the best-prepared state in the nation for COVID-19,” said Governor Ricketts.  “All across the state, individuals, businesses, employers, and churches are stepping up to make plans to mitigate the impact of the virus.  There is a role for each one of us in this as we work together to keep people healthy.”

The State of Emergency will help the State bring together the resources it needs to combat COVID-19.  It does not mean the State is closing schools or banning mass public gatherings at this time.  A copy of the State’s guidance regarding school closures and large gatherings can be found by clicking here.

Additionally, Governor Ricketts signed an Executive Order waiving certain hauling requirements.  A copy of the Executive Order can be found by clicking here.

A copy of the Governor’s emergency declaration can be found by clicking here.

updated: 3/13/2020


Gov. Ricketts Issues Guidance for School Closures

Click Here for full details

LINCOLN – Today, Governor Pete Ricketts issued guidance for school closures and provided an update on the state’s preparations for COVID-19 along with education and business leaders.

“I am issuing guidance today to help schools and families understand when state-directed closures will occur,” said Gov. Ricketts.  “Until the thresholds in the guidance are met, school districts will continue to manage their operations based on the best information they have.  We continue to ask everyone – individuals, families, employers, schools, and churches – to prepare for closures in their community as social distancing widens.”

“The Nebraska Department of Education (NDE) is committed to assisting schools and communities during the ongoing public health emergency,” said NDE Commissioner Matt Blomstedt.  “We support districts in their decisions to keep student and staff safety their top priority.  We encourage schools to work with local health departments.  We also want schools to continue to serve the community however they can and to provide some sense of normalcy for students.”

School closure guidance can be found by clicking here.

A map of ESU districts can be found by clicking here.

COVID-19 resources for schools can be found by clicking here.

A link to the video from today’s news conference can be found by clicking here.

update: 3/13/2020


Knox County Update – PSA

The North Central District Health Department (NCDHD) has received further information on COVID-19 testing conducted on Knox county residents.  The following is a Knox county case count update:

  • Total number of Knox county residents tested for COVID-19: 6
    • Total number of presumptive positive COVID-19 cases: 1
    • Total number of cases undergoing further testing at the Nebraska Public Health Lab: 0
    • Total number of cases that tested negative: 5

The presumptive positive case remains hospitalized at the University of Nebraska Medical Center’s (UNMC) Biocontainment Unit. This individual’s first lab specimen was collected at Avera Sacred Heart in Yankton, SD. The individual remains presumptive positive.

NCDHD has taken appropriate actions in Knox county to slow the spread of   COVID-19.  Anyone who has been identified to have close contact with the presumptive positive case during the onset of their symptoms has been notified and needs to remain in quarantine through the end of day on March 19th.  NCDHD continues to follow plans to respond to COVID-19. If there are positive lab results in NCDHD’s nine counties, NCDHD will continue to initiate public health controls to stop the spread of disease.

update: 3/13/2020


Two Patients Under Investigation for COVID-19 Lab Results are Presumptive Negative – PSA

Two residents in Knox county had been under investigation for possible COVID-19. North Central District Health Department (NCDHD) received notification that these individuals tested presumptive negative for the disease.

North Central District Health Department provides the Center for Disease Control (CDC) guidance tips via our website and Facebook pages on how to help reduce the spread of respiratory illnesses including COVID-19.  NCDHD continues to encourage patrons of our district to wash their hands using proper handwashing techniques, avoid those who may be sick, if you feel sick, please stay home, and if you think you need to seek medical attention, please call ahead.

COVID-19 symptoms include a fever, cough, and breathing difficulties. Anyone who is experiencing these symptoms should stay home and contact their healthcare provider. Most people who become ill from this disease will recover with rest, fluids, and by taking pain and fever medication.

Additional information on tips for yourself, your family, home, or office can be found at the Center for Disease Control (CDC) website at cdc.gov

updated: 3/13/2020


Patient Under Investigation for COVID-19 Lab Results are Negative – PSA

A resident of Cherry County had been under investigation for possible COVID-19. North Central District Health Department (NCDHD) received notification that this individual has tested negative for the disease.

North Central District Health Department provides the Center for Disease Control (CDC) guidance tips via our website and Facebook pages on how to help reduce the spread of respiratory illnesses including COVID-19.  NCDHD continues to encourage patrons of our district to wash their hands using proper handwashing techniques, avoid those who may be sick, if you feel sick, please stay home, and if you think you need to seek medical attention, please call ahead.

COVID-19 symptoms include a fever, cough, and breathing difficulties. Anyone who is experiencing these symptoms should stay home and contact their healthcare provider. Most people who become ill from this disease will recover with rest, fluids, and by taking pain and fever medication.

Additional information on tips for yourself, your family, home, or office can be found at the Center for Disease Control (CDC) website at cdc.gov.

update: 3/12/2020


Potential Exposure Events – PSA

North Central District Health Department (NCDHD) has identified the people that are at highest risk associated with the presumptive positive COVID-19 case in Knox County. These individuals are in self-quarantine and are not a risk to the public.

Potential exposure events that community members should be aware of include:

  • Girls State Basketball Hartington Cedar Catholic vs. Weeping Water Game held in Lincoln, NE on March 5th at 9:00 AM. This game was held at Lincoln Southwest High School.  Exposures may have occurred in the Hartington Cedar Catholic general fan section. The individual sat in the middle of the bleachers, about halfway up, and in the general fan section on the Hartington Cedar Catholic side during the game.
  • Girls State Basketball Crofton vs. Bancroft-Rosalie/Lyons-Decatur held in Lincoln, NE on March 5th at 7:00 PM.  This game was held at Lincoln North Star High School.  Exposures may have occurred in the Crofton general fan section. They sat in the middle of the gym, slightly higher than half up, in the general fan section on the Crofton side during the game.
  • Crofton Elementary students and staff who attended school on March 10th

If additional risks are identified, North Central District Health Department will release this information publicly and work with those affected.

If you feel you have been in direct exposure, please contact our North Central District Health Department office at 402-336-2406.

updated: 3/11/2020


COVID-19 Information Line 8:30am -4:00pm

Do you have additional questions about COVID-19?  Call the COVID-19 informational line for answers to these questions at 402-444-3400.

updated: 3/11/2020


COVID-19 Presumptive Positive Case- PSA

On the evening of March 10th NCDHD was made aware of the first presumptive positive coronavirus case in our district. The person is a student in Knox county. The person started experiencing symptoms Thursday, March 5th.

NCDHD has initiated contact investigations and have been rapidly assessing potential exposures to determine next steps. All identified close contacts will self-quarantine (stay home) and be actively monitored twice daily by public health officials for fever and respiratory symptoms.

At this time, we are encouraging the community to self-monitor their symptoms. Symptoms of COVID-19 are fever, cough, and shortness of breath. If you feel you are ill, please call your provider and follow their next steps.

update: 03/10/2020


No Confirmed Cases in the NCDHD Area

At this time we have no confirmed cases of COVID-19 in our NCDHD Area.
Reminders:
☝️ Continue to wash your hands
✌️ Stay home if you are sick
👌 If you feel you need medical attention, call your provider first and follow their next steps.

updated: 3/10/2020


When to Visit – Community Support

Older adults and people who have serious chronic medical conditions like Heart disease, Diabetes, Lung disease, or other underlying health issues should be taken into special consideration when planning visits to nursing homes or assisted living facilities. If you have a loved one in one of these types of settings please, if you feel the least bit under the weather, do not visit.

updated: 3/9/2020


Confirmed Case in Nebraska

NCDHD is aware of the Fremont Family YMCA Special Olympic event that took place in Fremont on February 29th where Nebraska’s first confirmed COVID-19 case had been in attendance. We are asking the patrons of our district that if there was anyone in attendance to follow these steps:
1. Self-quarantine
2. Limit exposure to others
3. Monitor themselves for development of COVID-19 symptoms
4. Call the NCDHD emergency after-hours line at 402-961-1718

 

EPA List of Products

The EPA has released a list of antimicrobial products helpful in preventing the spread of COVID-19. While wiping down frequently touched surfaces in your home be sure to read and follow product instructions. View more information in the link below and a full list of products.

Find additional information and the full list here: EPA.GOV Disinfectant List

updated: 3/7/2020


Guidance for Businesses and Employers

As we build awareness and prepare individually, as families, and as communities, we encourage businesses and employers to review their policies and capacity when discussing a plan and response to COVID-19. Follow this link from the CDC to help with those efforts.

Prevention & Treatment

Though there is currently no vaccine to prevent  COVID-19, the best prevention is to avoid being exposed to the virus. Everyday preventive actions will help prevent the spread of respiratory diseases.

  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth.
  • Stay home when you are sick.
  • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw the tissue in the trash.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces using a regular household cleaning spray or wipe.
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, especially after going to the bathroom; before eating; and after blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing.
  • If soap and water are not readily available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol. Always wash hands with soap and water if hands are visibly dirty.

Read more here: CDC: Prevention and Treatment

updated: 3/6/2020


 

Preparedness

North Central District Health Department encourages the citizens in Antelope, Boyd, Brown, Cherry, Holt, Keya Paha, Knox, Pierce, and Rock counties to practice preparedness at all times to avoid running out of essential items in times of natural disaster or an illness outbreak.

As awareness and conversations of COVID-19 continue, here are a few steps to consider and discuss in your household. It is always encouraged to keep a two-week supply of essential items on hand.

1 Daily Activities:
What do you do on a daily basis? Where do you go? Work, school, daycare? Consider how a lengthly illness could impact those these types of activities and prepare accordingly.

2. Take Inventory: What do you use on a daily basis? Consider preparing meals ahead of time and keeping a two week supply of things like toilet paper, non-perishable foods, baby formula, diapers, medications, and pet food on hand. There is no need to stockpile, but having some extras on hand is best practice when staying prepared.

3. Update Contacts: Review personal contacts and discuss who needs to be contacted in an emergency. Create an emergency contact list and post it in a central location in your home. Make copies for safes, totes, cars, and employers. Consider others that you may assist regularly. How will they be assisted if you are unavailable?

4. Prescriptions and Subscriptions: Review any prescriptions to see if a 90-day supply is possible. Make sure expired medications are disposed of properly. if you subscribe to food delivery service, grocery pick up or online/subscription services such as Amazon, consider how a halt in these services may affect your household.

Unsure where to start? Visit the links below for additional information.

Ready.gov CDC: Get Your Household Ready

updated: 03/03/2020