COVID-19 FAQ

The 2019 Novel Coronavirus, or COVID-19, is a new respiratory virus first identified in Wuhan, Hubei Province, China. This is an emerging, rapidly evolving situation. NCDHD is committed to ensuring our residents and healthcare professionals have access to the most up-to-date information to ensure the health and safety of themselves, their patients, and our community. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is closely monitoring this outbreak and publishes the most accurate and timely information. Please visit the CDC at www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/ 

If you have traveled to an area with widespread or ongoing community spread (Level 3 Travel Health Notice) or believe you have been in contact with someone who is sick with Novel Coronavirus, please contact NCDHD. Phone- 402-336-2406 or our 24/7 emergency line at 402-961-1718.  You can also CLICK HERE to fill out an online form.

Frequently Asked Novel Coronavirus Questions

FAQ available in Spanish here.

Q: What is 2019 Novel Coronavirus?

A: The 2019 Novel Coronavirus, or COVID-19, is a new respiratory virus first identified in Wuhan, Hubei Province, China. Learn about 2019 Novel Coronavirus.

Q: What is a novel coronavirus?

A: A novel coronavirus (CoV) is a new coronavirus that has not been previously identified.

Q: What is the source of COVID-19?

A: Public health officials and partners are working hard to identify the source of the COVID-19. Coronaviruses are a large family of viruses, some causing illness in people and others that circulate among animals, including camels, cats and bats. Analysis of the genetic tree of this virus is ongoing to know the specific source of the virus. SARS, another coronavirus that emerged to infect people, came from civet cats, while MERS, another coronavirus that emerged to infect people, came from camels. More information about the source and spread of COVID-19 is available on the COVID-19 Situation Summary: Source and Spread of the Virus.

Q: How does the virus spread?

A: This virus probably originally emerged from an animal source but now seems to be spreading from person-to-person. It’s important to note that person-to-person spread can happen on a continuum. Some viruses are highly contagious (like measles), while other viruses are less so. At this time, it’s unclear how easily or sustainably this virus is spreading between people. Learn what is known about the spread of newly emerged coronaviruses.

Q: Is COVID-19 the same as the MERS-CoV or SARS virus?

A: No. Coronaviruses are a large family of viruses, some causing illness in people and others that circulate among animals, including camels, cats and bats. The recently emerged COVID-19 is not the same as the coronavirus that causes Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) or the coronavirus that causes Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS). However, genetic analyses suggest this virus emerged from a virus related to SARS. There are ongoing investigations to learn more. This is a rapidly evolving situation and information will be updated as it becomes available.

Q: How can I help protect myself?

A: Visit the CDC COVID-19 Prevention and Treatment page to learn about how to protect yourself from respiratory illnesses, like COVID-19.

Q: What should I do if I had close contact with someone who has COVID-19?

A: There is information for people who have had close contact with a person confirmed to have, or being evaluated for, 2019-nCoV infection available online.

Updated: 3/9/2020